Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the category “photos”

Discovered in Norwich

murreyandblue

Whilst visiting Norwich to see the Whitefriars plaque to Lady Eleanor Talbot, Richard’s sister-in-law, in Tomblands near the Cathedral, I happened to take lunch in a particular hostelry, the Glass House. It is principally named for the city’s stained glass industry and various panels, also commemorate the author Harriet Martineau, the rebel Robert Kett, Cotman and the other “Norwich School” artists.

The panel nearest the main door was this one (left). Sir Thomas, who bore the name of a North Norfolk village, served John of Gaunt, helped to implement Henry IV’s usurpation before joining Henry V as an archery commander at Harfleur and Azincourt, and eventually dying in 1428. The other pictures are of Sir Thomas,  Henry IV and the Upper Close at Norwich Cathedral. 

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Grundisburgh

This EADT article is about the village just a few miles from Ipswich town centre, including the rather splendid mediaeval St. Mary’s Church (left) with about sixty angels on the hammer-beam roof, wall paintings, a more recent tower and a cenotaph. Grundisburgh Hall is not far away, as is Alice Driver Road, named after the 1558 martyr that the article omits to mention.

John Ball and Colchester

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Here are some of the panels just inside the door of the Colchester Playhouse, now a theatre-themed public house. They illustrate John Ball, after whom a minor town centre road is also named, becoming a priest, a prisoner at Maidstone and then participating in the 1381

Peasants’ Revolt (from 30 May), fighting at Blackheath (on 12 June) and then being executed at St. Alban’s on 15 July that year.

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murreyandblue

Here are some of the panels just inside the door of the Colchester Playhouse, now a theatre-themed public house. They illustrate John Ball, after whom a minor town centre road is also named, becoming a priest, a prisoner at Maidstone and then participating in the 1381

Peasants’ Revolt (from 30 May), fighting at Blackheath (on 12 June) and then being executed at St. Alban’s on 15 July that year.

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Nine of Ipswich’s oldest buildings …

many of which we have visited:

Wingfield

murreyandblue

Wingfield is a village in the middle of North Suffolk, just a few miles off the A140. There is a “castle”, but this is privately occupied and the owner is a little secretive. The village also features a small “college” and wedding venue, also known as Wingfield Barns, but its main features are St. Andrew’s Church and the “de la Pole Arms”, an excellent hostelry which is directly opposite the churchyard.

This Church tells the story of the de la Poles as they expanded from their mercantile origins in Hull and married an heiress of the Wingfield line. Monuments to three heads of the family and their spouses lie near the altar, which was moved further east as the church grew to accommodate the last of these tombs. Nearer to the door, a board (left) summarises the de la Pole genealogy as they experienced close association with the Black Prince…

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Newsletter: September 2017

MAG Newsletter Sept 2017

Further information on Christchurch Mansion

This Cricketerswas our original report. The additional image comes from The Cricketers, a nearby hostelry.Cricketers2

Newsletter June 2017

MAG Newsletter June 2017

Visiting Hadleigh

Hadleigh Church and graveyardReturning to Hadleigh

Hadleigh Guildhall
Guildhall, Hadleigh

Monument, Hadleigh High StreetIMG_0023IMG_0024

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Corn Exchange, Hadleigh

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Group Newsletter: March 2017

mag-newsletter-march-2017

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