Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the month “October, 2017”

An event in London

The following has been received from the Society:
The Richard III Society
Promoting research into the life and times of Richard III since 1924
Patron: HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO
Bringing you the latest important news and events about Richard III.

Dear Members,

Professor Caroline Wilkinson will be presenting a lecture on 23rd November 2017. Professor Wilkinson was responsible for creating the Society’s facial reconstruction of Richard III.
The Combined Royal Colleges Medal Lecture

This year’s lecture will be given by

Professor Caroline Wilkinson
23rd November 2017 at 18.30-21.00

at the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists, 27 Sussex Place, Regent’s Park, London, NW1 4RG

Depicting the Dead:
the use of clinical imaging for forensic identification and archaeological investigation

Clinical images are incredibly important for the analysis and assessment of living bodies, but they can also be utilised for forensic identification and archaeological investigation.

This presentation will describe how clinical images contribute towards the depiction of faces from the past and from contemporary forensic investigation and discuss the challenges and limitations of this research. You will discover the application of clinical imagery to the depiction of famous historical figures (such as Richard III and Robert the Bruce), preserved bodies (such as Ancient Egyptian mummies or bog bodies) and disease or trauma in ancient populations.

For further details and information on how to obtain a ticket (£5) go to

http://www.rps.org/events/2017/november/23/combined-royal-colleges-lecture-2017

The Executive Committee
Richard III Society

Copyright © 2017 The Richard III Society, All rights reserved.

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More Tyrrells, this time in Oxfordshire. One family or two?

murreyandblue

This (below) is Shotover Park in Oxfordshire, formerly part of the Wychwood royal hunting forest. It becamAerial_View_of_Shotover_House_(geograph_4217497)e the property of one Timothy Tyrrell in 1613, the year after the death of Henry Stuart,  Prince of Wales, whom Tyrrell had served as Master of the Royal Buckhounds. Tyrrell was further honoured with a knighthood in 1624 and his grandson James built the current House, a listed building, on the site in 1714-5.

Stuart Oxfordshire was not Yorkist Suffolk, Prince Henry was not Richard III and buckhounds are not horses. Nevertheless, Sir Timothy was serving the Crown in a very similar role to that of his namesake and it is not surprising that readers will wonder whether he was related to Sir James through a different branch of the family, as a direct descendant or not at all. In a similar case, we showed “Robin” Catesby to be descended from…

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Wingfield

murreyandblue

Wingfield is a village in the middle of North Suffolk, just a few miles off the A140. There is a “castle”, but this is privately occupied and the owner is a little secretive. The village also features a small “college” and wedding venue, also known as Wingfield Barns, but its main features are St. Andrew’s Church and the “de la Pole Arms”, an excellent hostelry which is directly opposite the churchyard.

This Church tells the story of the de la Poles as they expanded from their mercantile origins in Hull and married an heiress of the Wingfield line. Monuments to three heads of the family and their spouses lie near the altar, which was moved further east as the church grew to accommodate the last of these tombs. Nearer to the door, a board (left) summarises the de la Pole genealogy as they experienced close association with the Black Prince…

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Another house for sale

murreyandblue

Have you ever wanted to own a property associated with the Gosnold familyimage (1)?

Well, here is your chance. Otley Hall, the childhood home of Bartholomew Gosnold, is now for sale and will hopefully be open more frequently. It was also featured here.

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A pastoral tale

murreyandblue

This article investigates why, as the Mediaeval Warm Period drew to a close, Britain (and particularly England) developed differently to many nations of Southern Europe.

Sandbrook mentions two major cultural factors: the tradition of salting bacon because ham could not be dry-cured and the evolution of the wool trade through the systematic elimination of the flock’s only natural predator – the wolf – through a hunting campaign led by Peter Corbet, from a Shropshire family, under Edward I. Corbet, who fought at Falkirk, may even have given his name to this.

Sheep could now safely be domesticated and their numbers greatly expanded. In Florence, the Medici saw the banking system develop as a result. In England, the best evidence is all around us. Whilst the Woolsack (left) has been a dominant feature of the House of Lords for centuries, the wealth generated

by the wool and cloth trade…

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