Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the tag “London”

The Staple

In early medieval times, ‘the staple’ meant England’s staple export: wool. But it was inconvenient and inefficient for the king’s men to collect the customs duties that were payable on the exported wool from every one of the hundreds of little English ports all around the country. London, Bristol, Ipswich and Sandwich were major ports but little ships could sail from any small harbour or river estuary. Therefore, since wherever the ships had sailed from, they were all taking their cargo of wool to Flanders (modern day Belgium and north-east France), it was easier to collect the customs when they arrived at their destination. In 1313, Edward II ordained that all merchants had to land their ‘staple’ at a port he would designate. During the Hundred Years War, England acquired Calais from the French and from the mid-fifteenth century until 1558 this port became the convenient Calais Staple, where customs duties were collected on all English wool exports.

From “A Year in the Life of Medieval England” by Toni Mount.

The image is Old bird’s-eye view plan of Calais by Braun & Hogenberg 1597

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An event in London

The following has been received from the Society:
The Richard III Society
Promoting research into the life and times of Richard III since 1924
Patron: HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO
Bringing you the latest important news and events about Richard III.

Dear Members,

Professor Caroline Wilkinson will be presenting a lecture on 23rd November 2017. Professor Wilkinson was responsible for creating the Society’s facial reconstruction of Richard III.
The Combined Royal Colleges Medal Lecture

This year’s lecture will be given by

Professor Caroline Wilkinson
23rd November 2017 at 18.30-21.00

at the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists, 27 Sussex Place, Regent’s Park, London, NW1 4RG

Depicting the Dead:
the use of clinical imaging for forensic identification and archaeological investigation

Clinical images are incredibly important for the analysis and assessment of living bodies, but they can also be utilised for forensic identification and archaeological investigation.

This presentation will describe how clinical images contribute towards the depiction of faces from the past and from contemporary forensic investigation and discuss the challenges and limitations of this research. You will discover the application of clinical imagery to the depiction of famous historical figures (such as Richard III and Robert the Bruce), preserved bodies (such as Ancient Egyptian mummies or bog bodies) and disease or trauma in ancient populations.

For further details and information on how to obtain a ticket (£5) go to

http://www.rps.org/events/2017/november/23/combined-royal-colleges-lecture-2017

The Executive Committee
Richard III Society

Copyright © 2017 The Richard III Society, All rights reserved.

Interesting Link

This link has been found by a sharp-eyed Society member living in Australia. It’s sure to give many hours of happy investigation!

10 Places to Visit in Medieval London

A new play

Ian Dixon Potter sent me the following info about a play he has written about Richard and asked me to share it with members of the MAG:

I’m a member of the Richard III society and a playwright. I’ve written a new theatre play about Richard III which opens in London on December the 8th and I would be grateful if you could bring it to the attention of members of your branch.

‘Good King Richard’ is the culmination of many months of research going back to contemporary sources and presents a revised view of Richard III, the events which propelled him onto the throne of England and two years later, caused his downfall.

This play proposes answers to a number of historical questions: What happened to the ‘Princes in the Tower’? What was the cause of the sudden death of Edward IV at only 41? Why did he order the execution of his own brother George, The Duke of Clarence? What was at the root of his increasingly bitter estrangement from his wife Queen Elizabeth? Why did Lord Hastings and The Duke of Buckingham turn against Richard? And what was the source of the various negative rumours that were spread about Richard, including his deformity, his murder of the Princes and his intended incestuous marriage to his niece, Elizabeth of York.

What emerges is a tale of deceit, treachery and murder but not at the hand of Richard who emerges as a noble, just and honourable figure, a man of great intelligence and deep principle. The real villains of the piece are two women united in their determination to see the throne of England occupied by their sons, Edward V and Henry VII and entirely careless of how much innocent blood is spilled to that end.

Good King Richard will be performed at the White Bear Theatre in Kennington from 8th to 20th December. The times of the performances will appear on the theatre website a few weeks before the opening night. : http://whitebeartheatre.co.uk/

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