Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the category “visits”

Wingfield

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Wingfield is a village in the middle of North Suffolk, just a few miles off the A140. There is a “castle”, but this is privately occupied and the owner is a little secretive. The village also features a small “college” and wedding venue, also known as Wingfield Barns, but its main features are St. Andrew’s Church and the “de la Pole Arms”, an excellent hostelry which is directly opposite the churchyard.

This Church tells the story of the de la Poles as they expanded from their mercantile origins in Hull and married an heiress of the Wingfield line. Monuments to three heads of the family and their spouses lie near the altar, which was moved further east as the church grew to accommodate the last of these tombs. Nearer to the door, a board (left) summarises the de la Pole genealogy as they experienced close association with the Black Prince…

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Further information on Christchurch Mansion

This Cricketerswas our original report. The additional image comes from The Cricketers, a nearby hostelry.Cricketers2

September Visit to Wingfield

Wingfield is our destination this month. We meet at the De La Pole Arms (Church Road, Wingfield IP21 5RA) on Saturday 23rd September at 12:30 for lunch.

Wingfield church

St Andrew’s Church, Wingfield

We will then cross the road to visit St Andrew’s Church. Here we will see the beautiful alabaster tomb of Richard’s sister, Elizabeth Plantagenet and her husband John De La Pole, duke of Suffolk. There is parking at the pub and the church is literally opposite.

Forthcoming Event…. Visit to Clare

We will be visiting the beautiful medieval town of Clare on Saturday 29th July, meeting at 12.30pm for lunch in The Swan in the High Street. MAG member, Zigurds Kronberg will then lead us in a walk around the town, hopefully visiting the Priory and the parish church of St Peter and St Paul. Please note parking is available at Clare Castle Country Park, Malting Lane, Clare CO10 8NW.

Clare Priory

Clare Priory

Newsletter June 2017

MAG Newsletter June 2017

A well-connected Archdeacon?

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As we said last year, late mediaeval prelates were often well-connected. Indeed, as this ODNB article shows, William Pykenham, Archdeacon of Suffolk, died some time in spring 1497, approximately sixty years after his father. His mother was Katherine Barrington, of the prominent Hatfield Broadoak family, which explains some of his appointments through her Bourchier and Stafford social connections, including that of Rector of Hadleigh in 1470. He served as an executor for his patron, Thomas Bourchier Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1486 and then for Cecily Duchess of York in 1495.

In his role as Archdeacon, Pykenham is associated with two great buildings, of which only these Gatehouses remain: one in Hadleigh and one in Ipswich. He also had dealings with two maternal cousins: Thomas and Thomasine Barrington, the latter being the wife of Sir John Hopton of Blythburgh.

Here too (top) is Barrington Hall, home of the family that…

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Visiting Hadleigh

Hadleigh Church and graveyardReturning to Hadleigh

Hadleigh Guildhall
Guildhall, Hadleigh

Monument, Hadleigh High StreetIMG_0023IMG_0024

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Corn Exchange, Hadleigh

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Group Newsletter: March 2017

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Newsletter December 2016

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St. Saviour’s Hospital

This was the Group’s surprise visit. To find the incongr15129896_10154254999758577_125289555_nuous ruins of this Bury St. Edmunds building, stand on Fornham Road, facing the supermarket car park with the car dealership and the bottom of Station Hill behind you then walk a few paces to the left. It dates from about 1184 and was probably founded by Samson, the town’s abbot to accommodate twenty-four residents but frequently had financial problems.

In 1446/7, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, who had been Lord Protector and Defender of the Realm to Henry VI by the same law under which Richard was to be invested, came here to await trial for treason. He died here “in suspicious circumstances” on 23 February, to be buried in St. Alban’s Abbey.

The Hospital was, predictably, dissolved in 1539 and the ruins consist of a large arch and some ground behind it, with several explanatory plaques.

 

Further reading: http://www.stedmundsburychronicle.co.uk/Rel-hospitals.htm

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