Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the category “visits”

Do you remember this?

This is the Group’s shield, used from 2003 and recently returned to us by John. It will be in use at tomorrow’s AGM.

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Nine of Ipswich’s oldest buildings …

many of which we have visited:

More Tyrrells, this time in Oxfordshire. One family or two?

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This (below) is Shotover Park in Oxfordshire, formerly part of the Wychwood royal hunting forest. It becamAerial_View_of_Shotover_House_(geograph_4217497)e the property of one Timothy Tyrrell in 1613, the year after the death of Henry Stuart,  Prince of Wales, whom Tyrrell had served as Master of the Royal Buckhounds. Tyrrell was further honoured with a knighthood in 1624 and his grandson James built the current House, a listed building, on the site in 1714-5.

Stuart Oxfordshire was not Yorkist Suffolk, Prince Henry was not Richard III and buckhounds are not horses. Nevertheless, Sir Timothy was serving the Crown in a very similar role to that of his namesake and it is not surprising that readers will wonder whether he was related to Sir James through a different branch of the family, as a direct descendant or not at all. In a similar case, we showed “Robin” Catesby to be descended from…

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Wingfield

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Wingfield is a village in the middle of North Suffolk, just a few miles off the A140. There is a “castle”, but this is privately occupied and the owner is a little secretive. The village also features a small “college” and wedding venue, also known as Wingfield Barns, but its main features are St. Andrew’s Church and the “de la Pole Arms”, an excellent hostelry which is directly opposite the churchyard.

This Church tells the story of the de la Poles as they expanded from their mercantile origins in Hull and married an heiress of the Wingfield line. Monuments to three heads of the family and their spouses lie near the altar, which was moved further east as the church grew to accommodate the last of these tombs. Nearer to the door, a board (left) summarises the de la Pole genealogy as they experienced close association with the Black Prince…

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A pastoral tale

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This article investigates why, as the Mediaeval Warm Period drew to a close, Britain (and particularly England) developed differently to many nations of Southern Europe.

Sandbrook mentions two major cultural factors: the tradition of salting bacon because ham could not be dry-cured and the evolution of the wool trade through the systematic elimination of the flock’s only natural predator – the wolf – through a hunting campaign led by Peter Corbet, from a Shropshire family, under Edward I. Corbet, who fought at Falkirk, may even have given his name to this.

Sheep could now safely be domesticated and their numbers greatly expanded. In Florence, the Medici saw the banking system develop as a result. In England, the best evidence is all around us. Whilst the Woolsack (left) has been a dominant feature of the House of Lords for centuries, the wealth generated

by the wool and cloth trade…

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Further information on Christchurch Mansion

This Cricketerswas our original report. The additional image comes from The Cricketers, a nearby hostelry.Cricketers2

September Visit to Wingfield

Wingfield is our destination this month. We meet at the De La Pole Arms (Church Road, Wingfield IP21 5RA) on Saturday 23rd September at 12:30 for lunch.

Wingfield church

St Andrew’s Church, Wingfield

We will then cross the road to visit St Andrew’s Church. Here we will see the beautiful alabaster tomb of Richard’s sister, Elizabeth Plantagenet and her husband John De La Pole, duke of Suffolk. There is parking at the pub and the church is literally opposite.

Forthcoming Event…. Visit to Clare

We will be visiting the beautiful medieval town of Clare on Saturday 29th July, meeting at 12.30pm for lunch in The Swan in the High Street. MAG member, Zigurds Kronberg will then lead us in a walk around the town, hopefully visiting the Priory and the parish church of St Peter and St Paul. Please note parking is available at Clare Castle Country Park, Malting Lane, Clare CO10 8NW.

Clare Priory

Clare Priory

Newsletter June 2017

MAG Newsletter June 2017

A well-connected Archdeacon?

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As we said last year, late mediaeval prelates were often well-connected. Indeed, as this ODNB article shows, William Pykenham, Archdeacon of Suffolk, died some time in spring 1497, approximately sixty years after his father. His mother was Katherine Barrington, of the prominent Hatfield Broadoak family, which explains some of his appointments through her Bourchier and Stafford social connections, including that of Rector of Hadleigh in 1470. He served as an executor for his patron, Thomas Bourchier Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1486 and then for Cecily Duchess of York in 1495.

In his role as Archdeacon, Pykenham is associated with two great buildings, of which only these Gatehouses remain: one in Hadleigh and one in Ipswich. He also had dealings with two maternal cousins: Thomas and Thomasine Barrington, the latter being the wife of Sir John Hopton of Blythburgh.

Here too (top) is Barrington Hall, home of the family that…

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