Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the category “visits”

A walk through Colchester

Here are some of the classic mediaeval sites and ruins that we visited in March:

St. John’s Abbey Gatehouse, the last remaining part of the c.1400 Abbey, accessible through a subway under Southway. Sadly, since 2003, the stairs have been deemed unsafe so the upstairs rooms, which we have previously visited with John Ashdown-Hill, are now out of bounds.

 

 

John Speed’s 1610 map. Unlike Leicester, I think he has the Blackfriars in the right place here, although he unaccountably forgot to include Town Station.

 

 

 

 

Scheregate Steps, the only surviving mediaeval gateway through the Roman wall. They allowed southward access to St. John’s Abbey from the town.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A 16th century drawing, showing the Roman walls, Eastgate and the town’s many medieval churches.

 

 

 

A statue of St. Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, on the Town Hall, where there are eight others, on the front and at the side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Red Lion, formerly owned by Sir John Howard, as he then was, and which many of us ate tea in, with John, a few years ago.

 

 

 

Tymperleys, founded in the late fifteenth century for Sir John’s steward.

 

 

 

 

The ruined Priory of St. Botolph (and St. Julian), after whom Town Station is actually named. Founded in c. 1099, this was the earliest house of Augustinian canons in England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further information see John’s book Mediaeval Colchester’s Lost Landmarks.

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The inspiration for Richard III’s rosary….

murreyandblue

The following article and extract are from Nerdalicious:

“ ‘In the nineteenth century the Clare Cross was found in the castle ruins. It’s actually a reliquary, containing a fragment of the True Cross, and it was probably made soon after 1450  so probably it belonged to Richard III’s mother. For that reason, when I got an agreement from Leicester Cathedral for a rosary to be buried with Richard III I chose a quite large, black wooden rosary which I bought years ago, when I was a student at the University of East Anglia, in Norwich. Then I had the cross and the central link replaced by George Easton (who made Richard III’s funeral crown for me too). George copied the Clare Cross for me, to replace the original crucifix, and he also made an enamelled white rose (like the ones he made for Richard’s crown) to replace the central link. A…

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2019 Group venues

We will be going to: Colchester (for a talk), Thetford, Rayleigh or the Essex Hadleigh, Stoke by Nayland and Ipswich for the AGM

So where exactly is “Orwell”?

murreyandblue

Harwich Town station is the end of the line, a twenty-five minute ride from Manningtree and the north-eastern extremity of Essex. As you cross the main road from the station car park, turning left takes you past a series of old buildings with Harwich Society plaques amid a modern setting. Some of these commemorate people such as Pepys, Christopher Newport the Jamestown settler and Christopher Jones, of Mayflower fame but the first of these is the site of the inn known as The Three Cups (left). Eventually, you will reach the Ha’penny Pier, from which the busy Port of Felixstowe is visible. Indeed, a passenger ferry across the rivers operates on most summer days.

Harwich is situated on the south bank of the confluence of the rivers Stour and Orwell. Between them lies the Shotley peninsula, which also features the village of Holbrook. Warner (Edward II, The Unconventional King, p.216)…

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Where to find that “Tudor” Y-chromosome?

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This very good blog post details the career and planned future of Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, who might have succeeded Henry VIII had he not died suddenly at seventeen and a legitimate half-brother been born a year and a quarterlater. It also states his original and current burial places, the latter being St. Michael’s Church, Framlingham, together with his wife, Lady Mary Howard

framlingham

Henry Fitzroy, whose mother was Elizabeth Blount, is one of the few adults in the disputed male line from Katherine de Valois’ widowhood. Her sons from this relationship(/s) were Edmund and Jasper, surnamed either Beaufort or Tudor, the second dying without issue in 1495. Edmund had only one son, later Henry VII. He had several sons – some died in infancy and Arthur as a teenager without issue in 1502, leaving Henry VIII. Henry Fitzroy and Edward VI were…

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Another clue to the mystery of the “Princes”?

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On the left is Gipping Chapel in Suffolk, attached to the Tyrrell property of Gipping Hall. It is a traGippingChapeldition within the Tyrrell family that the “Princes”, the sons of Edward IV who were technically children, lived there during 1483-4 “with the permission of the mother”

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To the right is St. Nicholas of Myra, the 4th Century Bishop who is the patron saint of children, inter alia. He survived Diocletian’s persecution to take office under Constantine and die of old age. Gipping Chapel was dedicated to him.

So what is he trying to tell us about them?

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March 2018 Newsletter

MAG Newsletter March 2018

Horrox on the de la Poles

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Two weeks after visiting Wingfield , I attended a “Wuffing Education” Study Day at Sutton Hoo, addressed by Rosemary Horrox on the de la Pole family. This juxtaposition of dates was entirely beneficial as their genealogy and history was fresh in my mind so it was easy to follow Horrox’s train of thought.

She covered the family’s commercial origins in Hull as two of three brothers, whose father’s forename is still unknown, left the city to enter the national scene, lending money to the King. Although Richard was probably William’s elder brother, their paths diverged as he sought a less acquisitive strategy and his male line descendants are less famous, expiring three generations later. William’s family is better known but trod a far more perilous path, particularly in royal moneylending. His son, Michael, served the Black Prince and John of Gaunt, being created Earl of Suffolk and marrying Katherine Wingfield before…

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Newsletter, December 2017

The latest issue of the Mid Anglia Group newsletter can be found here:

MAG Newsletter Dec 2017

Do you remember this?

This is the Group’s shield, used from 2003 and recently returned to us by John. It will be in use at tomorrow’s AGM.

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