Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the tag “Ipswich”

Nine of Ipswich’s oldest buildings …

many of which we have visited:

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Further information on Christchurch Mansion

This Cricketerswas our original report. The additional image comes from The Cricketers, a nearby hostelry.Cricketers2

Some historical figures of Ipswich

Terry Hunt of the EADT writes here about some famous pechaucerople with Ipswich links: Chaucer (as an ancestor of Richard’s brother-in-law) and Wolsey (Richard’s contemporary) are obvious cases, as is Dickens. He doesn’t mention Thomas Cromwell (after whom the Square is named) but he does mention Charlie Chaplin, whose grandparents lived here.

The sinister secret of the Cornhill, Ipswich

murreyandblue

This is about to undergo a little refurbishment. The first picture shows the eastern approach to the Cornhill, where heresy executions took place during the sixteenth century, whilst the others are from the monument in Christchurch Park.

See also: https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/a-colchester-mystery/ or https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/an-afternoon-in-hadleigh-2006/

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The Friaries and Priories of Ipswich

wolseys-gate-1

On the bottom left is the Buttermarket Centre, formerly the home of the Whitefriars or Carmelites. There were Greyfriars (Franciscans, whose name survives near Princes Street) and Blackfriars (Dominicans, based near St. Mary’s Quay).

The mid-“Tudor” Christchurch Mansion, on the bottom right, is on the site of the Holy Trinity Priory. Whether this was newly built or merely adapted, is presently uncertain. There was also a Priory of St. Peter and St. Paul, partially replaced by Wolsey’s Gate, above.

An article on Old Ipswich …

murreyandblue

… which, sadly, refers to the Old Cattle Market as a venue but doesn’t discuss the previous purpose – a cattle market that I visited in c.1980, just before it was demolished to build the new bus station.

The cattle had just left after the day’s trading although I can still visualise the building. The market had several previous locations, such as the part of Princes Street that hosted HMRC until last year , where oxen often escaped to roam among the tight-knit streets nearby:

http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/ipswich_icons_old_cattle_market_just_the_ticket_for_growing_service_1_4075300

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The “Colourblind Cartographer” came to Ipswich

murreyandblue

Many of you will remember reading, perhaps in “The Last Days of Richard III”, how John Speed went to Leicester looking for the site of the Greyfriars but confused it with the Blackfriars which was in a far worse state of repair thus no royal body could possibly have survived.

Yesterday, I lunched at the “Robert Ransome” in Ipswich – table 22 in case you ask. On the wall were several interesting photos, including Speed’s 1610 Ipswich map. Apart from his unaccountable failure to include the railway station, it compares well with the town four centuries later.

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Those Howards again

GoldenLionWe all know by now that the Red Lion in Colchester was originally the White Lion because this was the emblem of the Howards but was renamed because the family was out of favour at James I’s accession.

History definitely wasn’t on my mind today but fish and chips in Ipswich town centre was. I chose the Golden Lion, a well-known Wetherspoon by the Cornhill, and read the above note on my menu. Again, it is a former White Lion in Howard country and is unrecorded before 1571, unlike the Colchester venue which is established as the home of Sir John Howard in the years before the Mowbray Dukes of Norfolk became extinct in 1482.

The latter date is significant because the fourth Howard Duke of Norfolk, Thomas, was executed in 1572 for treason that encompassed marrying Mary of Scotland. His attainder was not reversed until the Restoration, perhaps because Mary’s son and grandson were the next two Kings of England, although another Thomas Howard was Earl of Arundel and Norwich during the Civil War years. As early as July 1603, the fourth Duke’s second but eldest surviving son, inevitably nThomas, was raised to the Earldom of Suffolk.

Cheers and a Happy Easter to all. Hope to see you all at Stowmarket and Gipping tomorrow.

March Newsletter

MAG Newsletter Mar 2016

September Newsletter 2015

https://www.facebook.com/download/1683759298525703/MAG%20Newsletter%20Sept%202015.doc

We are sorry this has not been blogged before.

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