Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the tag “Ipswich”

Grundisburgh

This EADT article is about the village just a few miles from Ipswich town centre, including the rather splendid mediaeval St. Mary’s Church (left) with about sixty angels on the hammer-beam roof, wall paintings, a more recent tower and a cenotaph. Grundisburgh Hall is not far away, as is Alice Driver Road, named after the 1558 martyr that the article omits to mention.

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“Horrible History for Families” – Ipswich

Every Wednesday and Friday during the summer holidays, these walking tours are coming to Ipswich. They are aimed at accompanied children from 7 to 12, although younger ones are welcome. They start at the Tourist Information Centre at 10:30* and last ninety minutes for £3. On the left, is a haunted image of Christchurch Mansion.

  • Please arrive by 10:15.

The Court of Requests and Thomas Seckford

murreyandblue

In 1484, King Richard III created a minor equity court to deal with minor disputes in equity; these are disputes where the harshness of common law would be acknowledged by those appointed by the Crown. Equity courts were mostly seen as the Lord Chancellor’s remit, and the split of the Chancery Courts from the Curia Regis happened in the mid-fourteenth century. By the time of King Richard III, the Chancery Court had become backlogged from cases pleading the harshness of the common law, and the Court of Requests was no doubt and attempt to remove minor equity cases from the backlog and free up court time – Richard’s attempt at reducing bureaucracy and better administration.

So successful was the Court of Requests that it survived Richard’s reign, and was formalised by the Privy Council of Henry “Tudor”, the usurper. It was a popular court, because the cost of cases was…

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Newsletter, December 2017

The latest issue of the Mid Anglia Group newsletter can be found here:

MAG Newsletter Dec 2017

Nine of Ipswich’s oldest buildings …

many of which we have visited:

Further information on Christchurch Mansion

This Cricketerswas our original report. The additional image comes from The Cricketers, a nearby hostelry.Cricketers2

Some historical figures of Ipswich

Terry Hunt of the EADT writes here about some famous pechaucerople with Ipswich links: Chaucer (as an ancestor of Richard’s brother-in-law) and Wolsey (Richard’s contemporary) are obvious cases, as is Dickens. He doesn’t mention Thomas Cromwell (after whom the Square is named) but he does mention Charlie Chaplin, whose grandparents lived here.

The sinister secret of the Cornhill, Ipswich

murreyandblue

This is about to undergo a little refurbishment. The first picture shows the eastern approach to the Cornhill, where heresy executions took place during the sixteenth century, whilst the others are from the monument in Christchurch Park.

See also: https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/a-colchester-mystery/ or https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/an-afternoon-in-hadleigh-2006/

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The Friaries and Priories of Ipswich

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On the bottom left is the Buttermarket Centre, formerly the home of the Whitefriars or Carmelites. There were Greyfriars (Franciscans, whose name survives near Princes Street) and Blackfriars (Dominicans, based near St. Mary’s Quay).

The mid-“Tudor” Christchurch Mansion, on the bottom right, is on the site of the Holy Trinity Priory. Whether this was newly built or merely adapted, is presently uncertain. There was also a Priory of St. Peter and St. Paul, partially replaced by Wolsey’s Gate, above.

An article on Old Ipswich …

murreyandblue

… which, sadly, refers to the Old Cattle Market as a venue but doesn’t discuss the previous purpose – a cattle market that I visited in c.1980, just before it was demolished to build the new bus station.

The cattle had just left after the day’s trading although I can still visualise the building. The market had several previous locations, such as the part of Princes Street that hosted HMRC until last year , where oxen often escaped to roam among the tight-knit streets nearby:

http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/ipswich_icons_old_cattle_market_just_the_ticket_for_growing_service_1_4075300

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