Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

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Newsletter June 2017

MAG Newsletter June 2017

A well-connected Archdeacon?

murreyandblue

As we said last year, late mediaeval prelates were often well-connected. Indeed, as this ODNB article shows, William Pykenham, Archdeacon of Suffolk, died some time in spring 1497, approximately sixty years after his father. His mother was Katherine Barrington, of the prominent Hatfield Broadoak family, which explains some of his appointments through her Bourchier and Stafford social connections, including that of Rector of Hadleigh in 1470. He served as an executor for his patron, Thomas Bourchier Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1486 and then for Cecily Duchess of York in 1495.

In his role as Archdeacon, Pykenham is associated with two great buildings, of which only these Gatehouses remain: one in Hadleigh and one in Ipswich. He also had dealings with two maternal cousins: Thomas and Thomasine Barrington, the latter being the wife of Sir John Hopton of Blythburgh.

Here too (top) is Barrington Hall, home of the family that…

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Visiting Hadleigh

Hadleigh Church and graveyardReturning to Hadleigh

Hadleigh Guildhall
Guildhall, Hadleigh

Monument, Hadleigh High StreetIMG_0023IMG_0024

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Corn Exchange, Hadleigh

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Red Lion Walk in Colchester

This informative and picturesque wall was not there when we walked through Colchester in November 2014:
https://www.facebook.com/R3SMidAngliaGroup/#

Newsletter December 2016

mag-newsletter-dec-2016

St. Saviour’s Hospital

This was the Group’s surprise visit. To find the incongr15129896_10154254999758577_125289555_nuous ruins of this Bury St. Edmunds building, stand on Fornham Road, facing the supermarket car park with the car dealership and the bottom of Station Hill behind you then walk a few paces to the left. It dates from about 1184 and was probably founded by Samson, the town’s abbot to accommodate twenty-four residents but frequently had financial problems.

In 1446/7, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, who had been Lord Protector and Defender of the Realm to Henry VI by the same law under which Richard was to be invested, came here to await trial for treason. He died here “in suspicious circumstances” on 23 February, to be buried in St. Alban’s Abbey.

The Hospital was, predictably, dissolved in 1539 and the ruins consist of a large arch and some ground behind it, with several explanatory plaques.

 

Further reading: http://www.stedmundsburychronicle.co.uk/Rel-hospitals.htm

Leiston Abbey

The Mid-Anglia Group visited the remains of Leiston Abbey about ten years ago. Here is Lizzie Drake’s take on it, for English History Authors:
http://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/finding-ruins-of-medieval-leiston-abbey.htmlLeistonAbbey

Colchester Castle

A small group of us met at the front of the Castle, at the southern end of Castle Park, on Saturday afternoon. We first viewed the outside of the present Norman structure, as well as the Lucas-Lisle memorial around the back, marking the spot that these two local Royalist leaders were shot in August 1648 after the siege. It is said that grass never grows there as a result.

Memorial at Colchester Castle

 

The inside of the Castle is arranged chronologically. The upstairs is devoted to the Iron Age and Roman eras. The many artefacts include some Iron Age tools and then illustrate the arrival of Claudius’ army (43 AD), the Temple of Claudius now laying under the Castle, Boudicca’s revolt (60), the later Roman period after Constantine’s conversion and their departure. We saw, by chance, a depiction of a boar among the Iron Age artefacts.

 

Iron age boar

The rest of Colchester’s history is displayed downstairs, starting with the Anglo-Saxons who abandoned towns for their first few centuries. Under a Viking threat in the North and Midlands, Edward the Elder and other Wessex Kings reurbanised the parts of England they still ruled. The Castle and other town landmarks such as St. John’s Abbey date from soon after the Norman Conquest. Several town charters, from the reigns of Richard I to William III, are on display. John Howard Duke of Norfolk, Francis Viscount Lovell and the Stafford brothers of Grafton  are glossed over a little here but the two centuries after Bosworth are not. The final exhibit in order is the siege and prison department, which names twenty-three people held here and then burned during Mary I’s short reign, amounting to eight per cent of her national total. Matthew Hopkins, the “Witchfinder-General” caused several mostly harmless people to be hanged between Bury St. Edmunds and Chelmsford during the 1640s although he died before the siege. Sir Charles Lucas, whose family bought St. John’s Abbey after it was dissolved, was a Royalist leader during these three months as was Sir George Lisle. Arthur Capell Baron Hadham, descended from Richard’s sister Anne of Exeter, was beheaded on Tower Hill the following March. James Parnell was a teenaged Quaker preacher imprisoned here until he died of starvation in 1655.

Colchester castle

In the century following the Restoration, Colchester Castle was intended to decay entirely but was purchased and rescued so, from the outside, looks like the complete article, although it may originally have been a little taller.

 

Travels in enemy territory (2006)

https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2014/02/22/travels-in-enemy-territory-2006/

A return to the East Riding (2007)

https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/a-return-to-the-east-riding-2007/

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