Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the tag “John Ashdown-Hill”

Where to find that “Tudor” Y-chromosome?

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This very good blog post details the career and planned future of Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, who might have succeeded Henry VIII had he not died suddenly at seventeen and a legitimate half-brother been born a year and a quarterlater. It also states his original and current burial places, the latter being St. Michael’s Church, Framlingham, together with his wife, Lady Mary Howard

framlingham

Henry Fitzroy, whose mother was Elizabeth Blount, is one of the few adults in the disputed male line from Katherine de Valois’ widowhood. Her sons from this relationship(/s) were Edmund and Jasper, surnamed either Beaufort or Tudor, the second dying without issue in 1495. Edmund had only one son, later Henry VII. He had several sons – some died in infancy and Arthur as a teenager without issue in 1502, leaving Henry VIII. Henry Fitzroy and Edward VI were…

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A new book by Lynda Telford …

… with a foreword by John Ashdown-Hill.

Here it is …

The latest on the hunt for Richard’s Y-chromosome

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Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, was born today in 1338, although he died just before his thirtieth birthday. He is, of course, a mixed-line direct ancestor of Richard III but he is the brother of Edmund of Langley, Richard’s male-line great grandfather.

Here, John Ashdown-Hill spoke to Nerdalicious about his attempts to locate Lionel and secure a little DNA. You may compare it with our earlier piece about a similar search.

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Newsletter, December 2017

The latest issue of the Mid Anglia Group newsletter can be found here:

MAG Newsletter Dec 2017

Do you remember this?

This is the Group’s shield, used from 2003 and recently returned to us by John. It will be in use at tomorrow’s AGM.

Newsletter: September 2017

MAG Newsletter Sept 2017

From the Society’s Executive Committee

To the members:
As some of you will be aware, John Ashdown-Hill’s health has deteriorated in recent months. We have now been given permission by John to advise members of the present situation. We do so in order that you may understand why John is now unable to accept bookings for talks. However, John is still working on books and articles. Also, following his recent talk at Middleham, in which he added much more text to his Powerpoint slides, John is hoping to post updated versions of some of his talks on his website, so that, if they wish, Branches and Groups could access that material for a presentation which would not require John himself to come and speak.
John has been diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease (MND). In his case this makes speaking and eating difficult, and John is losing weight. The Society will offer John what support it can, at the same time sending him its best wishes and positive thoughts. Clearly, we cannot ask for a recovery, but we can hope that the remainder of John’s time will be comfortable and free of pain.
If you do send John messages of support, please do so in the understanding that you may, or may not, receive a response. We can be sure though that John will appreciate knowing that the Society wishes him well.

The Norfolk Branch programme 2017

norfolk-ricardian-winter-2017

John Ashdown-Hill and the myths about Richard….

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John Ashdown-Hillhttp://www.chelmsfordweeklynews.co.uk/news/colchester/14304947.Top_Five_picks_for_this_year_s_Essex_Book_Festival/

For those who can get to Wivenhoe Library on March 2, one of the picks is John Ashdown-Hill’s The Mythology of Richard III:-

John Ashdown-Hill: The Mythology of Richard III, Wivenhoe Library, High Street, Wivenhoe, Wednesday, March 2, 7pm. £7, £5 concessions. THE Essex-based historian was one those responsible for finding the lost remains of Richard III under a Leicester car park in 2012. In his latest book he unravels the web of myths of a king who according to Shakespeare was a hunchback tyrant that killed his own nephews.the web of myths of a king who according to Shakespeare was a hunchback tyrant that killed his own nephews.

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Hair today, gone tomorrow

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Following our post on Sunday, (https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2015/06/07/a-lock-of-a-kings-hair/) you may have heard that there was a lock of hair in Moyse’s Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds, belonging to Edward’s granddaughter Mary “Tudor”, who became Queen of France and Duchess of Suffolk. This was investigated at the behest of John Ashdown-Hill, as she would share mtDNA with Edward’s sons, but there has been no success so far:
http://www.johnashdownhill.com/richard-iii-dna/2014/1/22/mt-dna-and-the-princes

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