Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the tag “Richard III”

Will they dig down for St Edmund, do you think….?

murreyandblue

abbey gardens, bury st edmunds

Searching for historic remains seems to be the thing now. More than ever since Richard III. I hope that the work of the folk who went to the Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds on International Dowsers Day will lead to another great discovery.

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An obituary

murreyandblue

Here is the BBC’s official post about Dr. John Ashdown-Hill, who died last Friday. However, his permanent legacy includes these Powerpoint presentations, originally devised so that he can still educate you about Richard, his life, family and era when he first became unwell enough to do so in person. Alternatively, this is the East Anglian Daily Times’ take.

Image: Riikka.

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Newsletter June 2018

MAG Newsletter June 2018

The Court of Requests and Thomas Seckford

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In 1484, King Richard III created a minor equity court to deal with minor disputes in equity; these are disputes where the harshness of common law would be acknowledged by those appointed by the Crown. Equity courts were mostly seen as the Lord Chancellor’s remit, and the split of the Chancery Courts from the Curia Regis happened in the mid-fourteenth century. By the time of King Richard III, the Chancery Court had become backlogged from cases pleading the harshness of the common law, and the Court of Requests was no doubt and attempt to remove minor equity cases from the backlog and free up court time – Richard’s attempt at reducing bureaucracy and better administration.

So successful was the Court of Requests that it survived Richard’s reign, and was formalised by the Privy Council of Henry “Tudor”, the usurper. It was a popular court, because the cost of cases was…

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Colwell Wood Cottage

Thought you might be interested in the following received from Pam Benstead, Worcester Branch

http://debrettancestryresearch.com/colwell-wood-colwell-wood-cottage/

This cottage in Devon once belonged to Richard Duke of Gloucester. It was featured in The Times on 29 September 2017 and many thanks to Judith Sealey who spotted it and gave me the photo.

The Court of Richard III

As some of you are fans:

On October 2nd the new version of Court of King Richard III by The Legendary Ten Seconds was released. Here are some links to it:-

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/court-of-king-richard-iii-single/id1290577539

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Court-King-Richard-Legendary-Seconds/dp/B075X3KY1L/ref=sr_1_1?s=dmusic&ie=UTF8&qid=1507056671&sr=1-1-mp3-albums-bar-strip-0&keywords=COURT+OF+KING+RICHARD+iii

Thanks very much to Ian Churchward for the links.

An event in London

The following has been received from the Society:
The Richard III Society
Promoting research into the life and times of Richard III since 1924
Patron: HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO
Bringing you the latest important news and events about Richard III.

Dear Members,

Professor Caroline Wilkinson will be presenting a lecture on 23rd November 2017. Professor Wilkinson was responsible for creating the Society’s facial reconstruction of Richard III.
The Combined Royal Colleges Medal Lecture

This year’s lecture will be given by

Professor Caroline Wilkinson
23rd November 2017 at 18.30-21.00

at the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists, 27 Sussex Place, Regent’s Park, London, NW1 4RG

Depicting the Dead:
the use of clinical imaging for forensic identification and archaeological investigation

Clinical images are incredibly important for the analysis and assessment of living bodies, but they can also be utilised for forensic identification and archaeological investigation.

This presentation will describe how clinical images contribute towards the depiction of faces from the past and from contemporary forensic investigation and discuss the challenges and limitations of this research. You will discover the application of clinical imagery to the depiction of famous historical figures (such as Richard III and Robert the Bruce), preserved bodies (such as Ancient Egyptian mummies or bog bodies) and disease or trauma in ancient populations.

For further details and information on how to obtain a ticket (£5) go to

http://www.rps.org/events/2017/november/23/combined-royal-colleges-lecture-2017

The Executive Committee
Richard III Society

Copyright © 2017 The Richard III Society, All rights reserved.

Wingfield

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Wingfield is a village in the middle of North Suffolk, just a few miles off the A140. There is a “castle”, but this is privately occupied and the owner is a little secretive. The village also features a small “college” and wedding venue, also known as Wingfield Barns, but its main features are St. Andrew’s Church and the “de la Pole Arms”, an excellent hostelry which is directly opposite the churchyard.

This Church tells the story of the de la Poles as they expanded from their mercantile origins in Hull and married an heiress of the Wingfield line. Monuments to three heads of the family and their spouses lie near the altar, which was moved further east as the church grew to accommodate the last of these tombs. Nearer to the door, a board (left) summarises the de la Pole genealogy as they experienced close association with the Black Prince…

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Great St Mary’s Church, Cambridge and its Royal Patrons

Giaconda's Blog

dscf3117

In the very heart of historic Cambridge, stands a tall and elegant late Perpendicular Gothic church, sandwiched between the colleges and market square.

The church of St Mary the Virgin has stood on the site since 1205; the first recorded rector being Thomas de Chiveley who was appointed in the reign of King John.

The church was burnt to the ground in 1290. The local Jewish population were blamed for this unfortunate event and were punished by shutting down their synagogue. After the rebuilding of the church it was re-named Great St Mary’s, to differentiate it from Little St Mary’s in 1351.

King Edward III was a benefactor of the church at this time, along with his re-founding of King’s Hall in Cambridge which was later assimilated into Trinity College during the reign of King Henry VIII.

dscf3096 Arms of King Edward III and his sons over the gateway to Trinity College…

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Events in Leicester (and beyond)

Special event to commemorate Richard III on Sunday, 19 March in Market Bosworth

In 2015 Market Bosworth felt very privileged to be a key resting place on the last journey of the mortal remains of King Richard III to their reburial in Leicester Cathedral. That special event, on 22 March, attracted many thousands of people to view the funeral cortège as it passed through the village which was bedecked with banners, bunting and shields in honour of the King. Thanks to the hard work of a small number of local people, the event, and in particular the sale of 1485 porcelain white roses, resulted in a small financial surplus being available for community use. Inspired by the legacy of the 22 March event, the Parish Council together with the village’s Richard III steering group, decided to use the fund primarily to commission an artwork to be installed in the Market Place. In addition to the village’s Richard III funds, the commemoration has been supported by Hinckley and Borough Council and the input of a small number of local volunteers. The artwork will be dedicated by the Rector of Market Bosworth Rev. Mark Poskitt, Richard Smith and Sally Henshaw representing the Richard III Society and Councillor Richard Allen the Mayor of Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council on 19th March.

The artwork has been crafted by local specialist stone sculptor, Damian Witty. Some images of Damian making the artwork will be uploaded to the Society’s website shortly. Apart from the text around the stone the centre will portray a white rose. The artwork will be officially revealed at 3.30 as part of a medieval themed event in the Market Place. Captain Mortimer and his re-enactors will be there, plus the award winning Hawkwise from the Battlefield Centre, medieval music, a special mobile cinema, Bosworth Battlefield retail stall, the community choir and much more. It is planned that bunting and floral displays in the colours of Richard III will be hung around the Square, and white roses will decorate shop windows.
The events are free, and commence at 1pm, concluding at 5pm.

Richard III Events in Leicester for reburial weekend 2017

Details have just been announced of events marking the anniversary of the reburial.
There will be a service at Leicester Cathedral at 3.00 pm on Saturday March 25th. Representatives of the Richard III Society will be taking part in the service. No further details of this are currently available.

The Richard III Visitor Centre, 4A St. Martins, Leicester, LE1 5DB Tel: 0300 300 0900 will holding a Question and Answer session with Philippa Langley at 10.00 am on Saturday March 25th. The price for this is £10. The event is due to be launched on Monday and should appear on the Richard III Visitor Centre website – www.kriii.com.

It is also understood that Philippa Langley will be opening the Belmont Hotel’s new Richard III bedroom at lunchtime on Friday March 24th. Philippa will also be hosting a dinner on the evening of Saturday March 25th. Further details of these events and a weekend package can be obtained.

A note about Middleham Castle RIII Standard flying on 16th March 2017

To mark the anniversary of the death of Anne Neville on March 16th, the Richard III Standard at Middleham Castle will fly at half-mast. It should be noted, however, that the castle itself is notopen to the public on this day.

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