Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society

Archive for the month “December, 2016”

To all members and supporters

seasons-greetings-2016-a-2

I hope you like this year’s card. The photo, taken by Somerset Group’s Helena Smith, is of the Richard and Anne window in Cardiff Castle. The window was designed by the architect Willam Bruges in the Gothic Revival style around 1860.
Advertisements

DIGGING FOR BRITAIN–NEW NEWS ON the BATTLE OF BARNET

murreyandblue

Like Bosworth, the actual site of the Battle of  Barnet has been the subject of much conjecture, especially as the area is heavily modernised. On the latest episode of DIGGING FOR BRITAIN, airing on BBC 4 on December 20 at 9 PM,  experts take a new look at the site and believe they can now pinpoint its actual location.

Hopefully, this programme will raise the profile of battlefields in general, which always seem in danger of being built on, as well as increasing awareness of the importance of this battle, in which Warwick the Kingmaker was slain and Edward IV was victorious. It was, of course, the 18 year old Richard of Gloucester’s first major battle as the two opposing armies railed against each other in a thick mist.

In itself, Barnet would have been a crushing defeat for the Lancastrians, having lost Warwick in the fray, but their insistence…

View original post 36 more words

A forthcoming biography …

… of King John by Ashley Mantle of the Worcestershire Branch.
The price is £5 and it will be available on Kindle soon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/King-John-History-Pocket-Monarchs/dp/1539891011/ref=sr_1_110?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1480958635&sr=1-110&keywords=king+john

Newsletter December 2016

mag-newsletter-dec-2016

St. Saviour’s Hospital

This was the Group’s surprise visit. To find the incongr15129896_10154254999758577_125289555_nuous ruins of this Bury St. Edmunds building, stand on Fornham Road, facing the supermarket car park with the car dealership and the bottom of Station Hill behind you then walk a few paces to the left. It dates from about 1184 and was probably founded by Samson, the town’s abbot to accommodate twenty-four residents but frequently had financial problems.

In 1446/7, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, who had been Lord Protector and Defender of the Realm to Henry VI by the same law under which Richard was to be invested, came here to await trial for treason. He died here “in suspicious circumstances” on 23 February, to be buried in St. Alban’s Abbey.

The Hospital was, predictably, dissolved in 1539 and the ruins consist of a large arch and some ground behind it, with several explanatory plaques.

 

Further reading: http://www.stedmundsburychronicle.co.uk/Rel-hospitals.htm

Post Navigation